Monday, March 24, 2008

They make a desert and call it Teton Trek

I see the Memphis Zoo's Teton Trek FAQ disputes our use of the word clearcut to describe their forest-removal technique:

Q. Did the Zoo "clear cut" the entire four acres?
A. No. While trees were removed from the land on which the exhibit will reside, the Zoo was able to protect trees that could be included in the construction plans.

Let's fix that for 'em:
Q. Did the Zoo "clear cut" the entire four acres?
A. Not in our opinion. While nearly all of the trees were removed from the land former old-growth forest on which the exhibit will reside, the Zoo was able to protect a handful of lonely trees that could be included in the construction plans provide shade and butt-scratching posts for elk.

Seriously, what word do you think is most appropriate to describe this scene:

Or (thanks, Billy!) this:

I think the answer is clearcut.

1 comments:

Mr. Webster said...

CLEAR-CUT ˈklɪərˈkʌt, ˈklɪərˌkʌt adjective, noun, verb, -cut, -cut·ting.
–adjective
1. formed with or having clearly defined outlines: a face with clear-cut features.
2. unambiguously clear; completely evident; definite: His sale of secrets was a clear-cut example of treachery.
3. of or pertaining to a section of forest where all trees have been cut down for harvesting.
–noun
4. a section of forest where all trees have been cut down for harvesting.
–verb (used with object)
5. to fell all the trees in (a section of forest) for harvesting.


Looks like a clearcut to me.